EF & Co. New Build Exterior-Part One

As I mentioned before, I spent a lot of time tweaking the layout and exterior elevation details with the architect.  I absolutely love how it turned out!  A couple features I'm really excited about are:

  • I love the symmetry and this house.  
  • I wanted the entrance to feel stately so it is recessed making it stand proud.
  • I want the house to feel like it's been there forever so I chose to do brick instead of lap or shake siding.  

Here are a couple photos I used as inspiration. As you can see, there are elements I like in each photo, even though the overall look may be different than the end result of mine:

Light Exterior & Symmetry

Light Exterior & Symmetry

Symmetry 

Symmetry 

Recessed Entry

Recessed Entry

Gutter Detail 

Gutter Detail 

Dormers

Dormers

Porch

Porch

My next big decisions to make will be finalizing the window color & grid pattern.  I will also need to decide what brick details I want: coin/no coin, proud band, and color, etc.

 

 

 

EF & Co. Yalecrest New Build

Front Elevation.png

 

If you follow me on Instagram, you know that I've been working on a Design/Build project for the last couple of months. It is located in the heart of the Harvard/Yale neighborhood in Salt Lake City, Utah.  I'm so excited for my first independent build project and am looking forward to sharing the progress with all of you.  Some of you have built or remodeled before so you're familiar with the process.  For those of you who haven't, I'm going to blog throughout the project so you can see not only the design elements come to life, but the vision of the home as a whole.  

I think it's important to set clear objectives and goals when undertaking a project large or small.  With this project, my main goals are:

1. Build a home that fits in to the neighborhood and compliments the intrinsic charm of its surroundings

2. Create an inheritable home that's classic and elegant, yet livable.  Because it's a speculative (spec) home, I want it to feel warm and inviting to appeal to a wide variety of potential buyers.

3. Functionality is critical, so I spent a lot of time working with the architect, tweaking the layout, roofline, windows, etc. to maximize every inch of the home.  I drove around the neighborhood noticing features I loved on existing homes and how I could incorporate unique architectural details to make the home feel special.

4. Quality is key so every element, detail, system, and finish that goes in to the home will be best in industry.  

5. This project will be a direct reflection of my brand, so while it's extremely scary to be so visibly vulnerable and opening up myself to criticism, I hope the end result is something I'm extremely proud of.  

I hope you enjoy the journey! 

Love Where You Live: An Interview With Designer Emily Foxley

Wow! It has been over a year since my last post, I guess you could say things have been busy around EF & Co.!  I had the opportunity to sit down with the talented team at Yalecrest Homes for an interview.  

"We sat down to talk with up-and-coming local designer Emily Foxley. Her travel-inspired, historically-integrative style poise her as a style maker in the Yalecrest area and beyond...."

Link to the full interview HERE!

 

Houzz-Exterior Color of the Week: 7 Ways With Warm Gray

It is pretty cool to wake up to an email from Houzz.  This morning, Houzz notified me that my house was featured in an Ideabook, Exterior Color of the Week: 7 Ways With Warm Gray by Jennifer Ott.  Jennifer Ott is a Houzz Contributor and Principal Designer at the San Fransisco-based firm Jennifer Ott Design, LLC.  To check out the entire Ideabook, click on the image below!   If you don't recognize the house right away, it's the third one. I'm so flattered by Jennifer's remarks:

"Here’s another beautifully detailed home with a simple color palette that allows the quality materials and interesting shapes and textures to stand out. It’s also a nice example of how to play up the trim on a house without going with a high-contrast white hue, as is commonly done. This palette of warm grays, browns and reds is simply elegant, and perfect for this home."

My House: The Kitchen

Yesterday I shared with you some kitchen inspiration images.  As you can see, I incorporated elements from each of the photos to create the perfect kitchen for me and the space.  It's a fairly small kitchen, typical of homes built in the 1920s.   Even though I was able to gain two feet from the stairway move, I only had about 11ft X 12ft to work with.  To make the kitchen feel as open as possible, I decided to do a couple things: 

  • One, I opted for built in appliances and a custom hood so that there was no visual break between the cabinetry and appliances.  In my condo I had stainless steel appliances and I was constantly wiping them down.  The OCD part of me not only loves the look, but appreciates not having to wipe smudges and dog drool off of them all the time!  
  • I also ran my cabinetry to the ceiling (if it's within your budget, I really recommend this) and chose glass uppers to draw your eye up.  They are pretty small, but I also like that I can display some of my china as I've been very lucky to inherit some beautiful collections from my parents and grandmother. 
  • I wanted an island, but the space was so narrow I couldn't accommodate an island with an overhang for barstools, which I really wanted.  I ended up designing a custom island with a butcher block top.  The island is big enough to store cookbooks, appliances, and wine, but narrow enough that I can easily get around the kitchen.  You can hardly tell, but the island is a light gray.  I really like that the island is a piece of furniture, so I can move it or change it in the future if I ever wanted to.
  • One of my favorite things about my kitchen is my waterfall backsplash.  I went with a basic Carrera marble which allowed me to do a waterfall backsplash instead of tile. I really wanted to use Calcutta Gold Marble, but given the difference in price, it wasn't a splurge I was willing to make.  Because the kitchen is so small, I think this blends seamlessly and makes it feel larger.  
  • I debated what color of hardware I wanted and style of faucet.  I am so happy I chose the faucet I did as I think it compliments the farm sink very well. The brass hardware ties in with the rest of the door hardware in my house, but I like mixing metals so I really appreciate the stainless cooktop and oven paired with the brass hardware. 

Here is the kitchen before: 

Here is the kitchen now:

Here you can see the kitchen from the other side.  Notice the island detail, I love how it turned out!

This is my stove top and oven.  I had a hard time deciding on the hood and how much I wanted it to angle out. Initially I wanted it to be flat, but am really happy I decided to go with a slight angle. What do you think? 

Here is a picture of my faucet close up.  I also love having under cabinetry lighting.  Another thing I suggest doing if your budget allows. 

My House: Doors & Windows

Initially when I bought my house I wasn't planning on replacing my windows and doors.  For starters, it's a pretty big budget item.  I also liked the look of my doors and windows (although some were broken and none of the bedroom windows opened).  However, I was over one day that happened to be very cold and rainy.  The wind was blowing like crazy and all my doors were blown open.  Once they were closed (and re-opneed with the next gust of wind), the house still felt drafty and it was the middle of summer.  I was torn.  I wanted to keep my original doors, but I felt like I would regret not replacing them while everything was open.  Plus, I didn't want to replace moldings and casings or try to match them a year down the road when I changed my mind (which I have a tendency of doing).  I decided on the Pella Architect Series doors and windows and absolutely love them!  They have the exact same grid system as my original doors and windows but are energy efficient, do not blow open on a windy day, and make me feel more secure.  I opted for Iron Ore exterior and unfinished wood interior.  I painted the inside the same color as my trim.  

Prepping for new window and doors

Prepping for new window and doors

My House: Exterior Before & After

The house needed a substantial amount of work.  Inside, there was water damage and mold, asbestos wrapped HVAC pipes, warped floors, broken windows, exposed electrical, and funky plumbing.  On the exterior, the charming {overgrown} ivy had completely rotted a large portion of the patio ceiling, soffit, and fascia.  Asphalt shingles were used as siding for the gables, which, on the west side of the house were completely sun damaged and peeling.  I also wasn't exactly sure about the red shutters.  They seemed too big for the gable and a little...creepy.

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Because the house was built in 1927, I wanted what ever work I did on the house to reflect the period in which the house was originally built.  I decided to used a scalloped shaker on the front gable of the house and replace the red shutters with an original door that was cut down to size.  I replaced all of the soffit and facia, poured new front steps that were deeper, and replaced all of the existing doors and windows.  There are so many options available that have the same look and feel as the original features, but offer better technology by way of energy saving and long-term maintenance.  

I probably tried 25+ different paint colors for the gables and trim.  It was so hard to decide, but eventually I settled on Benjamin Moore Iron Mountain for the trim and Benjamin Moore Amherst Gray for the gables and front door.  Windows and doors are Pella Architect Series in Iron Ore. What do you think of the after? 

Photo Cred: Lucy Call

Photo Cred: Lucy Call

My House: Taking Shape

Once the demo was complete, which took about a week, we started framing.  My stairway was relocated, the door to my bedroom from the kitchen was closed off, and my master suite was turning out nicely.  Since I was downsizing, I was worried that my new master bedroom would feel too small.  I think I taped off the size of Queen and King bed dimensions at least ten times trying to see how much room it left me.  Here are some picture of the house as it was framed and the drywall was added.  It's amazing how fast all of this happened!  Right before my eyes my house was transforming and it was awesome!  I'm sure my foreman got sick of me as I was there every morning, usually during lunch, and first thing after work. 

When I relocated my internal stairway, I also moved the entrance from the side to the back

When I relocated my internal stairway, I also moved the entrance from the side to the back

My House: Demo Phase

One of my favorite things is seeing a space stripped down to the studs.  I instantly start visualizing exactly how the space will look when it's put back together. I have noticed that there are two kinds of people when it comes to space and design: some have an exact idea of how something will look and can easily visualize the changes.  The second group have a harder time needing a lot of pictures, drawings, and other examples to really see the vision. I would definitely characterize myself as the former.  It's a great skill in some ways, but I've had to learn how to extrapolate and explain what's in my mind so it can click to the person I'm explaining it to.  That is another reason I'm really excited to take some drafting and CAD classes.  I think it will really seal the deal when explaining some of my ideas.  What do you think?  Which type of person are you?

View from Living in Room into what became the Master Bedroom and Closet

View from Living in Room into what became the Master Bedroom and Closet

Here you can see the brick chimney chase that was running through the middle of my house.  Part of this area eventually became the new Stairway.

Here you can see the brick chimney chase that was running through the middle of my house.  Part of this area eventually became the new Stairway.

The Upstairs Bathroom- part of it was used for my Master Shower and Water closet, the other part for the Half Bath 

The Upstairs Bathroom- part of it was used for my Master Shower and Water closet, the other part for the Half Bath 

Wall removed to open up the Kitchen to the Dining Area

Wall removed to open up the Kitchen to the Dining Area

Kitchen area

Kitchen area

One of the most significant changes, moving the Stairway from the back of the house to the front

One of the most significant changes, moving the Stairway from the back of the house to the front

Watch Your Step!

Watch Your Step!

Basement

Basement

Basement

Basement

New Floor Plan: Part 2

My contractor had a great idea to move the stairway from the back of the house to the front entryway.  This change made such a dramatic difference.  Dead space in the entry now became a beautiful stairway where I could display my artwork.  The new stairway was wider, which simultaneously made them safer and improved the flow of the entire house.  I was also able to gain two extra feet in my kitchen and add a mudroom. We also removed the obsolete brick chimney chase and combined the two small bedrooms into a large, spacious, and functional master bedroom.  With the reconfiguration I was also able to add a half bath, which was great!  Here is a {near} final copy of my new floor plan:

New Floor Plan: Part 1

As I mentioned before, my house was originally built in 1927 and the way we use space has changed over the past 88 years.  When I started thinking about how I wanted to use the space, I knew there were a couple of things I wanted to change.  To give you a better idea, here is the original floor plan:

There were a lot of things I loved about the existing floor plan:

  • Five doors along the front side of the house that opened up to a big patio
  • Ample windows an naturual light
  • Large living room and fireplace
  • POTENTIAL!!!

I had a couple things in mind that I wanted to change:

  • I wanted to open up the kitchen as it was closed off from the rest of the house and on the small side
  • I also wanted to add a half-bath for guests as I'm a bit of a germaphobe
  • There were two doors going in to the biggest bedroom
  • The second bedroom didn't have a closet
  • There was a large brick chimney chase running through the whole house and right through the existing closet, eating up prime real estate!
  • There wasn't any storage space (granted it was a small house, but there was nada, zip, zilch)

My House: More Before & After Photos

If you've been following me on Instagram @emilyfoxleyandco you've already seen some of these.  I love to see them side-by-side to really put the transformation in perspective.   will keep posting about each individual space with more detailed information on what I did!

My House: Before Interior Photos

I don't have many good "before" pictures of my house.  Most of them are from the MLS listing or my camera phone, but hopefully it gives you a better idea of the condition of the house when I purchased it. 

Welcome to Homeownership

I've always been a worrier and an over analytical person.  So, when I went from CONDOowner to HOMEowner, part of me was excited and the other part terrified.  Did I bite off more than I can chew?  What am I going to do about this yard?  Oh but look at all of those doors and that patio, perfect for entertaining. How am I going to fit all of my furniture in to this tiny house?  Look at your new view, it's amazing!  Thoughts like these ran through my mind for days, but when when I got the keys and it settled in that THIS way MY house, I was twitter pated.  Then quickly back to overwhelmed and stressed!  

My New View

My New View

House Hunting

The first piece of property I purchased was a spacious condo with incredible city views.  It had floor to ceiling windows throughout, a cozy den with built in bookcases, formal dining room and living room, a swanky wet bar, and a massive master bedroom, bathroom, and closet.   At the time, I was in my early/midish-twenties, did not want a yard or the hassle of maintaining a home.  A condo fit the bill perfectly.  I could lock my door and leave for weeks at a time, without having to worry about anything.  After a couple of years, I was ready for a change.  Some of the features that attracted me to condo living in the beginning, eventually became a hassle.  At the beginning of the year I made up my mind that I was ready for a house.  

My Wishlist Included the Following:

  • Established neighborhood with large trees and character
  • Walkable and centrally located
  • Some green space where I could entertain outdoors
  • A yard that was big enough for Teddy, but not too big
  • Approximately 2,000- 2,500 square feet
  • A house that needed to be redone from top to bottom, inside and out

My wishlist narrowed down the area pretty quickly, and I began looking at homes in the Yalecrest or Harvard/Yale area of Salt Lake City, Utah.  I looked at dozens of houses over the course of a couple months and nothing felt right. Then my realtor told me about a new listing. When I walked through I instantly knew it was the perfect house.  After several hours of anxiously waiting and a competitive counter offer, the seller accepted and my realtor called me close to midnight to tell me the good news.  This picture was taken that night!